Dairy Business News Team's Posts (766)

Center for Dairy Excellence to Host Mealtime Meetings

 

Harrisburg, Pa. – The Center for Dairy Excellence will host five mealtime meetings across Pennsylvania to collect feedback and input on resources to direct the future of the state’s dairy industry. The Center invites dairy industry professionals to participate in an informal discussion about dairy profitability and associated topics. 

“Pennsylvania’s dairy industry is in a tremendous state of change right now, and the meetings will provide the opportunity for industry professionals to gain more insight into market factors influencing that change,” said Jayne Sebright, executive director of the Center for Dairy Excellence. “We also want to hear from, and have a conversation with, those who work in the dairy industry on the resources needed to support dairy farms across the commonwealth.”

Field representatives, nutrition consultants, lending agents and all industry representatives are invited to prepare topics which they would like to discuss, from business planning to dairy policy. Center staff members will be joined by representatives from American Dairy Association North East (ADANE) and agents with the Penn State Extension Dairy Team, who will speak to current trends and topics in Pennsylvania’s dairy industry.  

Meetings will be hosted on the following dates:

·   May 12 at 8:00 a.m., Dutchway, 649 E Lincoln Avenue, Myerstown, PA.

·   May 16 at 8:00 a.m., Country Cupboard, 101 Hafer Road, Lewisburg, PA

·   May 16 at 1 p.m., Riverstone Inn, 47 Leisure Drive, Towanda, PA

·   May 19 at 8:00 a.m., Bird’s Nest Cafe, 113 S Richard St., Bedford, PA

·   May 19 at 1 p.m., Hoss’s Steak and Sea House, 1948 Leesburg Grove City Road, PA

Pre-registration is requested by Monday, May 8. Meals are provided for up to three participants per location from each dairy farm, group or business courtesy of the Center for Dairy Excellence. To register, call 717-346-0849 or visit the “Programs and Events” tab on centerfordairyexcellence.org.

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Cow livability and revised body weight composite in net merit

By Paul VanRaden and Tom Lawlor 

Cow livability (LIV) was introduced as a new trait in August 2016 and is now included in lifetime net merit dollars (NM$). Cows that die are assumed to generate $1,200 less income than those sold for beef. Relative emphasis on LIV in December 2016 NM$ is 7%, but is counteracted by decreasing the relative emphasis on productive life (PL) from 19% to 13%. This revision does not change the expected genetic progress for PL but will cause more progress for LIV and healthier cows. 

Body size composite (BSC) was updated by Holstein USA in August 2016 to better predict actual body weights, and that change is now also used in NM$. The previous formula for BSC is replaced by the new formula for body weight composite (BWC):

BSC = .5 * stature + .25 * strength + .15 * body depth + .10 * rump width

BWC = .23 * stature + .72 * strength + .08 * body depth + .17 * rump width - .47 * dairy form

Major differences are that BWC is estimated from much more recent data, each unit of BWC is associated with larger differences in body weight than those of BSC, and BWC uses dairy form to account for presence or absence of fat in addition to skeletal size. Composites for other breeds were updated with this same formula except that Jerseys and Brown Swiss are not scored for body depth, so the .08 for body depth was added to the .72 for strength in those breeds. The standard deviation of predicted body weight has increased, and this causes more negative emphasis in NM$ (-6% on BWC vs. -5% previously on BSC). Genetic correlations of BWC with other traits also differ from those previously used for BSC:

Trait
BSC BWC
Stature
0.96
0.64
Strength
0.87
0.94
Body depth 
0.92
0.72
Rump width 
0.75
0.59
Dairy form 
0.45
-0.16

Therefore, use of BWC instead of BSC in NM$ reduces the selection against stature, body depth, rump width, and dairy form. 

Economic values for other traits were updated with 2 additional years of price data, resulting in small reductions in milk price, a shift in value of fat relative to protein, and less emphasis on somatic cell score. For recent bulls, the 2017 and 2014 NM$ indexes were correlated by 0.99. Further details are provided HERE


Revision of heterosis adjustments

By Paul VanRaden, Gary Fok, and Mel Tooker

Heterosis adjustments had been computed incorrectly for 14 of the 58 Montbeliarde bulls and 5 of the 34 Simmental bulls with US daughter records. Most Montbeliarde and Simmental bulls have pedigrees containing ancestors of more than 1 breed and their pedigree breed composition was stored in a table for crossbreds, but some have purebred pedigrees and were not in the table. For those bulls, the default heterosis value of 0 for purebreds had been used and was correct for the animal’s own heterosis, but should have been 100% for the expected heterosis of progeny because the bull’s breed differs from its breed of evaluation. Their predicted transmitting abilities (PTAs) will increase by 9 pounds protein, 20 pounds fat, and 2.7 daughter pregnancy rate (DPR) for example when their expected heterosis adjustment is corrected. None of the top 10 Montbeliarde or Simmental bulls were affected. This problem was detected while designing new programs to convert PTAs from the all-breed to within-breed scales.

Heterosis adjustments were also incorrect for traditional PTAs of crossbred cows. Those adjustments had been programmed separately and used the cow’s own heterosis instead of the expected progeny heterosis as intended, which is usually only half as large, and therefore PTAs of crossbred cows received too much adjustment. Cows with maximum of 100% heterosis (F1 crossbreds) will have their traditional PTAs decreased by 4.5 pounds protein, 10 pounds fat, and 1.4 DPR, with proportionally smaller decreases for cows with less heterosis. Differences from this adjustment are fairly small because the expected future inbreeding (EFI) differences between crossbreds and purebreds account for most of the total heterosis effect, and the EFI adjustments were applied correctly. Genotyped cows will be much less affected by this heterosis adjustment because the marker effects receive more emphasis than the traditional PTA, and because genotypes for crossbred cows that do not pass the breed check edits are not evaluated.


Correction of SCS parent averages for non-genotyped heifers

By Ezequiel Nicolazzi, Gary Fok, and Paul VanRaden

A coding mistake introduced in the August 2016 evaluation caused females to receive a better SCS (traditional) evaluation than they should have and, as a consequence, also their other (traditional) evaluations that use SCS information such as multi-trait productive life and net merit were impacted. Some nongenotyped heifers had received net merit values that seemed to be incorrect. Upon investigation, the cause was determined to be a bug in one of the computer programs that handles cow unknown parent group contributions to SCS traditional evaluations. This bug was introduced just before the August 2016 evaluation. Please note that due to the nature of the group of animals involved, this issue affected mainly heifer parent averages that were not public, and therefore released only to Dairy Records Processing Centers. This, and the fact that genomic evaluations were not affected, is probably the reason why the bug went unnoticed for so long. We have now fixed the bug and tested the program in order to avoid this event from propagating further. We thank Bill Verboort for reporting this problem after the December triannual run, and we are sorry for the inconvenience.

Some non-


Revision of rear udder width for Brown Swiss

By Ezequiel Nicolazzi and Jan Wright

Interbull evaluations for rear udder width (RUW) will now be used for Brown Swiss, which is the only breed with RUW evaluations from Interbull. In April 2017, RUW for Brown Swiss will be published according to the following criteria:
1) if a bull has a traditional or Interbull evaluation, then the evaluation with the highest reliability - usually Interbull - will be considered as the official value for RUW.
2) if a bull does not have either of the above evaluations (please remember there is no direct genomic evaluation on this trait), then the official value of RUH will be used as the official value for RUW.
Other breeds are not affected by this change.


 

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So far this year, CWT has assisted member cooperatives who have contracts to sell 19.102 million pounds of American-type cheeses, and 1.375 million pounds of butter (82% milkfat) to 12 countries on four continents. The sales are the equivalent of 207.252 million pounds of milk on a milkfat basis.

Assisting CWT members through the Export Assistance program in the long term helps member cooperatives gain and maintain market share, thus expanding the demand for U.S. dairy products and the U.S. farm milk that produces them. This, in turn, positively affects all U.S. dairy farmers by strengthening and maintaining the value of dairy products that directly impact their milk price.


The amounts of dairy products and related milk volumes reflect current contracts for delivery, not completed export volumes. CWT will pay export assistance to the bidders only when export and delivery of the product is verified by the submission of the required documentation.

The Cooperatives Working Together (CWT) Export Assistance program is funded by voluntary contributions from dairy cooperatives and individual dairy farmers. The money raised by their investment is being used to strengthen and stabilize the dairy farmers’ milk prices and margins. For more information about CWT, visit www.cwt.coop.

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Money Raised Supports Undergraduate Programs

Good news for Wisconsin golfers is that after a long winter the grass is finally starting to green.  No doubt, this sign of spring and warming temperatures has you dreaming about those fun days on the golf course with your buddies.  Why not get the rust off your clubs and kick-off your season at the UW-Madison Dairy Science’s Dave Dickson Memorial Golf Classic?  This year’s outing is scheduled for Wednesday, May 17 at the award winning University Ridge Golf Course in Madison.  

University Ridge is the home course of the UW Badgers and will again play host to the PGA’s Champions Tour, American Family Insurance Championship in June.

The golf outing is the department’s primary fundraising event.  All proceeds support the dairy science department’s undergraduate student scholarship program and high impact learning activities such as student travel, hands-on learning laboratories, and undergraduate research.  Last year’s outing raised nearly $30,000 for those programs.

The Golf Classic uses a scramble format, where each team member plays the ball closest to the hole after each shot. The event is open to the public. A registration fee of $135 per golfer pays for 18 holes of golf, cart rental, free lunch and lots of prizes. The registration fee after April 20 will be $150.

Individuals or companies can support the event through a sponsorship or donation.  One option is to sponsor a hole for $300 or $800 (the latter includes a team registration for four golfers). Beverage, lunch, breakfast and brat cookout sponsorships for $600 or $1,000 are also available and come with special event signage.

There will be both a silent and live auction, featuring a variety of dairy-related items and sports memorabilia. Donations of auction items are welcome and will be accepted until May .

“It’s a great way to socialize and have fun, but more importantly, the event benefits our students. This is an opportunity to invest in the future of the dairy industry,” says Kent Weigel, chairman of the UW-Madison Department of Dairy Science.

Additional information and the registration brochure can be found at dysci.wisc.edu. To learn more about donations or sponsorships contact Cathy Rook by email at rook@wisc.edu or phone at 608-263-3308.  Don’t delay! 

MARK YOUR CALENDAR NOW FOR THE 2017 DAIRY SCIENCE GOLF CLASSIC

Money Raised Supports Undergraduate Programs

Good news for Wisconsin golfers is that after a long winter the grass is finally starting to green.  No doubt, this sign of spring and warming temperatures has you dreaming about those fun days on the golf course with your buddies.  Why not get the rust off your clubs and kick-off your season at the UW-Madison Dairy Science’s Dave Dickson Memorial Golf Classic?  This year’s outing is scheduled for Wednesday, May 17 at the award winning University Ridge Golf Course in Madison.   

University Ridge is the home course of the UW Badgers and will again play host to the PGA’s Champions Tour, American Family Insurance Championship in June.

The golf outing is the department’s primary fundraising event.  All proceeds support the dairy science department’s undergraduate student scholarship program and high impact learning activities such as student travel, hands-on learning laboratories, and undergraduate research.  Last year’s outing raised nearly $30,000 for those programs. 

The Golf Classic uses a scramble format, where each team member plays the ball closest to the hole after each shot. The event is open to the public. A registration fee of $135 per golfer pays for 18 holes of golf, cart rental, free lunch and lots of prizes. The registration fee after April 20 will be $150.

Individuals or companies can support the event through a sponsorship or donation.  One option is to sponsor a hole for $300 or $800 (the latter includes a team registration for four golfers). Beverage, lunch, breakfast and brat cookout sponsorships for $600 or $1,000 are also available and come with special event signage.

There will be both a silent and live auction, featuring a variety of dairy-related items and sports memorabilia. Donations of auction items are welcome and will be accepted until May . 

“It’s a great way to socialize and have fun, but more importantly, the event benefits our students. This is an opportunity to invest in the future of the dairy industry,” says Kent Weigel, chairman of the UW-Madison Department of Dairy Science.

Additional information and the registration brochure can be found at dysci.wisc.edu. To learn more about donations or sponsorships contact Cathy Rook by email at rook@wisc.edu or phone at 608-263-3308.  Don’t delay! 

Read more…

The University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Department of Dairy Science invites prospective students and their parents to visit campus on          Wednesday, April 12, 10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., to explore what the program has to offer.

Those attending will get a firsthand look at one of the world’s leading dairy science departments as they tour the UW-Madison campus and Dairy Cattle Center, meet faculty, participate in hands-on workshops and learn about the wide variety of learning opportunities available to dairy science majors. Current students and alumni will be on hand to answer questions and share their experiences. 

The UW-Madison undergrad dairy science program emphasizes a combination of cutting-edge, science-based knowledge and hands-on experience. Award-winning research and extension faculty teach more than 20 undergraduate courses covering nutrition, reproduction, mammary physiology, genetics and other aspects of dairy management.  On-campus, state-of-the art dairy facilities enhance the learning experience.

“For high school students, spring of their junior year is really when I would recommend they start taking campus visits,” says Kent Weigel, professor and chair of the dairy science department. “Making a college visit and touring the campus can be pivotal in a student's decision to attend college and what schools they end up applying to.”

“Students are often amazed by the small-school feel of our ag campus and the extra benefits they get studying at a Big Ten university,” states Weigel.  “That, and our proximity to the heart of the dairy industry, is what makes UW-Madison such a special place for our students to attend college.”

For UW-Madison admission eligibility, it is recommended that seniors rank in the top 25 percent of their high school class. Transfer students must have completed at least 24 semester hours of college–level work. Most transfer students have a GPA of at least a 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. 

To attend the Dairy Science Spring Visit Day, please register on-line by April 7 at dysci.wisc.edu.  For more information, contact Cathy Rook at (608) 263-3308 or rook@wisc.edu.

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Three major dairy groups were in Mexico last week trying to repair strained relationships between the U.S. and Mexico on trade.

According to Farm Journal’s Milk, some Mexican dairy leaders question President Donald Trump’s recent policies on immigration and his desire to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement.  

Tom Vilsack, secretary of agriculture and now CEO of the U.S. Dairy Export Council, told Mexican leaders attending the National Dairy Forum in Mexico City that the dairy industry has always considered Mexico as a “partner first and a customer second” and that the U.S. dairy industry intends to continue working with Mexico and its own dairy industry to increase dairy consumption in a way that is beneficial to both countries.........

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(© Flickr Creative Commons (Mick Baker)rooster)

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Princess proud of dairy duties

ELLENBURG — An interest in pageants and a passion for the dairy industry helped Grace Harrigan become just the second Clinton County dairy princess since 1986. 

Four years ago, she was chosen Franklin County dairy ambassador.

Two years later, she began the Clinton County Dairy Promotion Program, which would position her for the role of dairy princess.

“During my reign, I focused a lot in building relationships with consumers and farmers and developing a team of ambassadors who are enthusiastic and knowledgeable,” she said.

STATE PAGEANT  

The 17-year-old also did well in the New York State Diary Princess Pageant.

“We had two days of testing. We went through a personal interview and a communications portion, as well as a product-knowledge test," she said.

The 19 young women who competed in the state pageant then had to present a three-to-five-minute speech.........

READ MORE...........

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New Hampshire's dairy farmers will soon be one step closer to getting financial relief.

The House is taking up legislation Thursday to provide $2 million in relief payments to dairy farmers strained by last year's drought.

The bill has already passed the Senate.

The $2 million is less than farmers had initially hoped for and will come months after they first asked for relief. The drought forced many farmers to spend more on feed or reduce the size of their herds. Dairy farmers say they're already facing a financial strain due to low federal milk prices..........

READ MORE.........

(© Flickr Creative Commons Joe Thomissen)

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A Minnesota dairy family will share a story of finding God’s love in the midst of tragedy at the Central Plains Dairy Expo Ag Prayer Breakfast.

The breakfast buffet will take place at the Denny Sanford Premier Center in Sioux Falls at 7 a.m. Wednesday, March 29. Tickets are $25 per person.

The featured speaker will be Rita Vander Kooi. She and her husband, Joe, operate the Ocheda Dairy in Worthington, Minn., where they raise their four children: Vince, 11; Liv, 8; Ava, 5; and Violet, 2.

Many people followed the family’s story through Vander Kooi’s blog, “So She Married a Farmer,” which became a source of support when her daughter was injured in an accident on a utility vehicle two years ago this spring............

READ MORE...........

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NAFTA showdown pits cars against cows

It’s cars versus cows.

The NAFTA showdown between Canada and the United States will pit the interests of the automotive industry and other exporters against protected sectors like dairy, telecommunications, airlines and banks, Carleton University Associate Professor Ian Lee said.

“You can bet that those four industries will shamelessly invoke Canadian nationalism to protect their own greed, their own private interests,” Lee said. “They’re going to wrap themselves in the flag and say they’re doing this for Canadian identity.

“The question is will the government if Canada, the Trudeau government, have the courage to take them on?”

The country’s dairy farmers, “12,000 multimillionaires” whose supply management system in the absence of American competition allows them to jack up prices, are most vulnerable to NAFTA renegotiations, he said..........

READ MORE...........

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Tulare DHIA Recognizes Top Herds

            The Tulare County dairy industry turns out full force for the annual banquet of the county DHI association held this year on Mar. 16 at the International Agri-Center in Tulare, with over 300 attending.  The Association has 169 herds on test with an average herd size of 2069 cows, six fewer herds but 11,000 more cows than last year.

            Board president Jared Fernandes thanked General Manager David Brown and Field Manager Tony Nunes who in turn recognized the staff of four office workers, three lab technicians and 27 field supervisors.  After a brief business meeting, the highlight of the evening was the presentation of top herd awards, introduction of youth scholarship winners and recognition of longtime agribusinessman and dairy industry supporter Bob Wasnick, partner in the dairy equipment firm, Wasnick Brothers of Tulare.

            The low somatic cell count herd was Sweeney Dairy of Visalia at 82,000 SCC.  The high producing herd based on energy corrected milk (ECM) was Terra Linda Dairy, Tulare, averaging 32,753 lbs. 3X.  The top ten herds based on ECM are:

  1. Terra Linda Dairy, Tulare – 32,753 (3X)
  2. John DeJong Dairy, Hanford – 30,084
  3. Elbow Creek Dairy, Visalia – 29,993 (3X)
  4. Rob Van Grouw Dairy, Visalia – 29,474
  5. Rancho Sierra Vista Dairy, Visalia – 29,409
  6. Dairyland Farms, Tipton – 29,065 (3X)
  7. Fernoaks Farms, Tulare – 28,559 (3X)
  8. M. C. Leal & Son Dairy, Tulare – 28,303 (3X)
  9. Riverbend Dairies, Tulare – 28,291 (3X)
  10. Hynes Dairy, Tulare – 28,258 (3X)

            The scholarship winners are Peyton Ferndandes, Natalie Ashburn, Andrew Brown, Zachary Fallert, Chase Gomes, Tiffany Herrera, Marvin Machado III, Blake Martin, Kymber Martins and Derrick Nunes.

HIGH HERD AWARD

General Manager Dave Brown, left, presents the high herd award to Mike Santos, Jr. of Terra Linda Dairy with an energy corrected milk average of 32,753 (3X)        

 

LOW SCC AWARD

Jim Sweeney, right, received the low SCC herd award with an 82,000 SCC average for 2016.  General Manager Dave Brown at left.

 

YEARBOOK DEDICATION

Bob Wasnick, right, was presented with the 2016 recognition by Tulare DHIA.  The Association’s yearbook was dedicated to him for his long career of service to dairymen at Wasnick Bros. dairy equipment.  Mike Santos made the presentation on behalf of the Association’s board.

 

TULARE DHIA HIGH HERD RECOGNITIONS

The owners of the top herds recognized who were at the annual banquet are, from left, Mike Santos, Jr., Tyler Van Grouw, Mitch Mouw, Jose Campos, Jim Sweeney and Greg & Gary Fernandes.

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A spike in empty cow rates shows how easily nature can expose flaws in dairying best practice, says a Waikato vet.

Tirau vet and farmer Ian Scott said the exceptionally wet spring and early summer experienced in many parts of the country had played a large part in an increased number of cows failing to get in-calf.

Empty rates among his clients were sitting about 13-14 per cent, although he had seen some herds with a rate nearer 18 per cent and heard of others in the 20s..........

READ MORE.........

(© Flickr Creative Commons Mark Goebel)

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March 20, 2017

In This Issue
High-Oleic Soybeans Could be Fourth-Largest Crop
DuPont Pioneer expands Encirca tools
Crop Insights
A Mild Winter Can Result in Added Insect Pressure
Managing Corn Rootworm
Community Investment
DuPont Pioneer Grant Adds Ag Related High School Classes

Did You Know?
DuPont Pioneer committed $100,000 to the Iowa AgriTech Accelerator, a business accelerator focused on ag technology startup companies.

More Information
Contact Susan Mantey
at DuPont Pioneer
susan.mantey@pioneer.com
614.902.0838
Visit the Media Resource
Visit Pioneer.com
 
News You Can Use
Planting season is just around the corner, and experts from DuPont Pioneer have plenty of advice for growers as they prep for the warmer temperatures. Story briefs this week include Pioneer field agronomists on how mild winter temperatures can affect insect pressure and tips for managing corn rootworm. Experts also discuss the potential growth for high-oleic soybeans and more in this week’s email. 

Want to speak with a Pioneer expert on these or other topics? Contact Susan Mantey Contact Susan Mantey.

Pioneer In the News
High-Oleic Soybeans Could be Fourth-Largest Crop
High-oleic soybeans, including Pioneer® brand Plenish® high-oleic soybeans, could be planted in as many as 15 million acres in the future, potentially replacing cotton as the fourth-largest crop in the United States, behind corn, commodity soybeans and wheat, Russ Sanders, director of food and industry markets at DuPont Pioneer told AgriNewsRead more

DuPont Pioneer expands Encirca tools
Harley Janssen, services manager, field technology at DuPont Pioneer, presents a new range of grower tools to allow for better usage of agricultural data. Farmers using these tools from EncircaSM services will have access to weather updates and can sign up for services related to in-field nitrogen management and other, similar services…Read more

Crop Insights
A Mild Winter Can Result in Increased Insect Pressure
A warmer winter can help make things easier when dealing with residue, but it can also result in added insect pressure, according to DuPont Pioneer Field Agronomist Brian Buck. Cold temperatures kill insect eggs in the soil, but with a mild winter, insect pressure may be higher than with a normal winter …Hear more

Want to speak to a local DuPont Pioneer expert on this topic? Contact Susan Mantey.

Managing Corn Rootworm
For every root node lost to rootworm feeding, growers can expect a 15 percent loss in yield. Rotating crops, using hybrids that contain a Bt trait for corn rootworm control and applying insecticide are a few of the ways rootworm can be controlled, according to Pioneer agronomists…Read more 

Want to speak to a local DuPont Pioneer expert on this topic? Contact Susan Mantey.

Community Investment
DuPont Pioneer Grant Adds Ag Related High School Classes
Owatonna High School in Owatonna, Minnesota, will offer a pair of new classes—Natural Resources and Ecology 1 and 2—thanks to a $4,800 grant from DuPont Pioneer. The high school’s agriculture teacher, Liz Tinaglia, will be able to offer the classes next year following a curriculum training course in Alaska this summer…Read more
Connect with us.
Read more…

What Are You Doing Here? Dairy Farmers Shake Up SXSW 2017

“What are YOU doing here?” was the questioned posed by many technology and food thought leaders last weekend as ten dairy farmers attended panels at SXSW. Minnesota Dairy Farmer Sadie Frericks replied, “We are here to talk about the intersection of technology and food production and how important it is to the future of food.”

The Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy sponsored several events including a Food + Technology Event where hundreds of people listen to California Dairy Farmer Aaron Wickstrom speak about technology on the farm. Participants chatted with farmers and interacted with a touch-screen milk cooler that encouraged people to learn about sustainable dairy foods.

In partnership with Spredfast (technology company), over 1,500 freakshakes or "extreme milkshakes" were handed out at an exclusive interactive event. People then shared their creations through Instagram which became a top trending topic coming out of the event. Special thanks to Dairy MAX and Dean’s/Dairy Pure who donated milk and whipped cream.

Our SXSW panel discussion “We Love Technology … Why Not When It Comes to Food?” explored the relationship of food, tech and consumer trust with Indiana Dairy Farmer Sue McCloskey representing the dairy perspective. It was one of the most attended panels in the SXSW Food Track.

Wisconsin Dairy Farmer Carrie Mess said, “Here at SXSW, when you look at all the options of panels it’s food, food, food, everywhere. And no one is talking about farmers. By (DMI) bringing us here, we are part of the conversation that is happening with or without us. It’s better for us to be here.”

If you would like to know more about the SXSW events, visit the Dairy Hub.

Brownsfield Ag News interviewed Washington Dairy Farmer Michelle Schilter

Agritalk Mike Adams interviewed Minnesota Dairy Farmer Sadie Frericks

AL.com interviewed Alabama Dairy Farmer Will Gilmer
Watch Video

Dairy Farmer Takes On Nintendo Mini Milking Game

California Dairy Farmer Nevin Lemos got the chance to review Nintendo 1-2 Switch udderly ridiculous new minigame about milking cows. Nevin was surprised at how accurate the game is. He also did a record 17 cups of milk. 
Watch Video

Four U.S. Dairy Messages for Mexico This Week

From the USDEC blog, “U.S. Dairy Export Council President and CEO Tom Vilsack says he is emphasizing four positive messages this week as he and other U.S. dairy leaders meet with Mexican government officials, dairy organizations and media.”

What are the messages?
  • Mexico is a highly valued U.S. dairy customer.
  • It’s important to preserve what's good in the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).
  • Don’t concede to the European Union on geographical indications.
  • The successful dairy partnership between Mexico and the United States can get even better.
Read More

Kroger and Oberweis Overhaul Traditional Milk Jugs

Recently, both Kroger - one on the world’s largest retailers – and Oberweis - a beloved and iconic brand based in the Chicago area -- introduced milk in bottles designed to maintain flavor quality in grocery stores by protecting it from light.

This was not just a happy accident. Dairy checkoff staff, led by Tim Stubbs, met with both companies to share checkoff-led university and consumer research to demonstrate that light in dairy cases can make milk taste bad.

As Tim told me, “We gave them definitive, quantified proof that consumers give a lower liking score when milk has been exposed to light.” Not good, but an opportunity.

Since then, Kroger and Oberweis have invested in new packaging that would make the milk taste experience better, for longer, for their customers. That experience can lead to more dairy moved over the long haul.
Join the Discussion

What’s The Difference Between The Dairy Hub and The Dairy Hub Newsletter?

Dairy Hub is a private social network that allows you to chat with dairy professionals and farmers, explore message resources, and see real time consumer trends and daily dairy news.

The Dairy Hub Newsletter (formerly MyDairy) is a newsletter that brings the best of dairy promotion online as well as conversations within the Dairy Hub directly to your inbox.

So if you are in the dairy industry, you can join the Dairy Hub. But if you aren't and you just want to keep up with what's going on in dairy promotion then send an email to don.schindler@dairy.org and I'll add you to the list.
Join Dairy Hub

Farming Is In Bret’s Blood

On New York Animal Agriculture Coalition website Bret Bossard talks about challenges and benefits of managing a New York dairy farm with three partners.

He says, “Like many businesses, our greatest challenges are the things that are out of our hands and that we have no control over. The price of milk is volatile and the weather is unpredictable.”
Read More

What Are Farmers Sharing

Well, we checked with our bosses and they still need to be fed, watered and milked.
Marilyn Hershey wins Dairy Woman of the Year
Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.
An interesting article for those worried about Glyphosate 
Success on the farm really doesn't mean much at all if you end up without anyone to pass it on to.
Kale! Thank you Vince for the heritage based name!!
 

What Are Farmers Sharing From The Dairy Hub?

What Are State and Regional Checkoffs Sharing?

Tennessee Titans wide receiver Marc Mariani celebrates with Mountain View Elementary with FUTP 60
Spring is right around the corner.
What do you do with all of that cow manure?
Alaska School Nutrition Association is fired up about starting breakfast programs and feeding kids.
It’s National Peanut Butter and Jelly Day!
In honor of Pi Day, we baked up a healthful 3.14 Fruit Pie!
These Bear Claw Brownies from @beckylows_kitchen feature a rich dark chocolate brownie with a crunchy top, salty cashews, and delicious milk chocolate chips.
Good nutrition doesn't have to be complicated! Does your family get the proper nutrients they need? MyPlate makes it easy to find out.
5 #diet tips that actually work from two registered #dietitians today at 2 p.m.!
#tbt to the smoothie contest at the @nysfair. Who wishes it was summertime already? We do, we do!
Are you leading a Dairy Good Life? Subscribe to our e-newsletter and be entered to win a Traverse City vacation package!
At Thomas College Wellness Fair, handing out samples of Cookie Dough Greek Yogurt.
Today one of the #101Bottles were delivered to @butlerblue3 as the @butlermbb team gets ready for #MarchMadness. Good luck!
In honor of National Nutrition Month’s message of cooking more at home using healthier ingredients, try this healthy two-cheese chicken penne with spinach recipe. Like father, like son, like son's son! Eleven-year-old Bryce is following in the hardworking footsteps of his father and grandfather on their California dairy farm.
Happy International Women's Day from one hardworking group of ladies to another!
Congrats to our college scholarship winners announced at the @Fiesta_Bowl. Jake won $12,000, Jack won $10,000 and Victoria won $8,000 - all to help them through their higher education!
 

Legen-dairy Single Serving Size For This Guy?

Last Dairy Hub Newsletter I asked for any legen-dairy and I got an outstanding T-shirt photo. Thanks so much to Jordan Hansen of Hansen’s Farm Fresh Dairy. Give them some love by visiting their website, farm and maybe getting your own T-shirts.

Do you have something legen-dairy to share with us?

We would love to see and share how you are promoting your dairy best products! Just email me atdon.schindler@dairy.org.
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dairy.org   |  dairygood.org   |  usdairy.com | usdec.org
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Convention Registration

  • Registration deadline is June 1 (midnight Pacific Daylight Time).
  • Online ticket sales close June 10 (midnight Pacific Daylight Time).
  • Online registrations with ticket purchases after June 1 will incur the required $50 late fee.
  • Mailed registrations postmarked after June 1 must include the required $50 late fee
  • Tickets are non-refundable.
 

Two Easy Ways to Register and Pay

 (Preferred)

  • Click Register Online to complete our online registration form.
  • Pay using our secure payment processing service, PayPal (No PayPal account is required).
  • We accept PayPal, Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express (personal cards only).
  • We will email you a pdf confirmation of your registration. 

  • Click Register by Mail to view a fillable pdf registration form (Just click in the desired field and begin typing.)
  • Please PRINT the form when you are done completing the fields. Depending upon your system, you may not be able to save the filled-in form to your computer.
  • We recommend printing two copies - one to mail and one for your records.
  • If your system does not support fillable forms, and you want a form to print and complete by hand, print this blank, non-fillable form, instead.
  • If you have more than one Junior - Fill out the first page for each junior.
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The Inaugural Livestock Judging Cup

The University of Arizona Livestock judging Team is putting on a golf tournament May 6th 2017. Proceeds from this event go to the support of the University of Arizona Livestock Judging Team.    

The golf tournament will be held at the Arizona National Golf Course in Tucson on Saturday, May 6, 2017 with a 8:00 AM shotgun start. Fees include lunch, golf cart, and practice balls. Following the tournament lunch will be provided and a prize ceremony will take place. Go ahead and try your luck out on the course!

 

 

 

Carmen Marie McConnel

Undergraduate Academic Advisor (Animal Science)

Livestock Judging Coach

Location: Vet Sci/Micro Rm 231 Office: 520-621-2658

School of Animal & Comparative Biomedical Sciences

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

University of Arizona

1117 E. Lowell St

PO Box 210090

Tucson, AZ 85721

Bear Down!

 

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DFA Today: Friday, March 17, 2017

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March 17, 2017

News


US estimated fluid milk sales decline

According to U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) EstimatedFluid Milk Products Sales Reportfor January, total fluid milk product sales decreased 0.8 percent to 4.26 billion pounds, compared to January 2016.

Total whole and flavored milk sales continued to increase, with year-over-year sales strengthening 42 million and 34 million pounds, respectively. 


Consumer sentiment update

According to the University of Michigan’s Surveys of Consumers, the preliminary result for the March consumer sentiment index is 97.6, up 1.3 points from the previous month.

While the index was up overall, consumer expectations were mixed. Future economic prospects were largely affected by partisanship, with Democrats more commonly reporting expectations of a recession while Republicans anticipate economic growth. Despite mixed future economic forecasts, renewed strength in current economic conditions ultimately led to a positive outcome for the March consumer sentiment index.

Daily Market Update

Provided by DFA Risk Management


Dairy

  • Second-quarter CME Group Class III milk futures strengthened with support from increases in the CME cash cheese markets. Despite today's strength, the second-quarter CME Class III milk futures average has decreased 31 cents per hundredweight since last Friday.
  • Supported by a stronger CME cash butter market, April CME butter futures increased more than 2 cents per pound. On this date in 2016, the CME cash butter market settled at $1.94, 19 cents per pound lower than today's settlement.
  • The spread between CME Class III milk futures and the DFA Risk Management feed index for the second half of the year is $8.56 per hundredweight, down 23 cents from last week. Weaker CME Class III milk futures, in addition to slight increases in CME corn futures, factored into the weaker margin. 

Grains and other markets

  • CME corn futures strengthened slightly as market participants attempt to balance increasing demand for corn exports and ethanol with strong global corn production. December CME corn futures increased this week after experiencing significant declines since the beginning of March. 
  • CME soybean futures remain under pressure from growing global stocks. Reports indicate Brazil's soybean harvest is more than 50 percent complete. Since March 1, November CME soybean futures have declined nearly 37 cents to $9.93½ per bushel.


 
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The Indianhead Holsteins Complete Herd Dispersal catalog is now online

Sale is Friday, April 7th at 11 a.m. in Barron, WI. Over 200 head being offered! Bob & Karyn Schauf, owners; Courtney Sales LLC, mgr. Click below for the catalog!  

 

http://sites.holsteinworld.com/courtneysales/indianhead-sale-catalog.pdf

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